Monday, March 17, 2014

Rwanda: Kagame Warns Dissidents: I Am Not A Musician

President Paul Kagame has sternly warned dissidents planning to destabilise Rwanda that they face grave consequences, emphasising he is not a musician to “entertain” those who seek to undermine the country's security.
By                                              
Chimpreprts
March 17, 2014              
President Kagame inspecting a guard of honour in Rwanda in 2013
President Kagame inspecting a guard of honour in Rwanda in 2013
 
This is the latest forewarning from the Rwandan leader a week after Kigali accused South Africa of harbouring masterminds of the Kigali grenade attacks in which several people died.
 
Exiled former army chief, Gen Kayumba Nyamwasa, who lives in South Africa is believed to be the architect of a wider plot to overthrow President Kagame.
 
Addressing Rwanda National Police’s Officer Cadets at their commissioning today, Kagame said: “My main responsibility is to the people of Rwanda, their development and their security.”
 
He further warned: “I am not a journalist or a leader of NGOs and my job is not to entertain those who compromise Rwanda's security."
 
“I am not a musician supposed to please anybody.”
Kagame told the 458 police officers that some countries continue to harbour and aid “criminals whose intent is destabilizing Rwanda. You need to be vigilant.”
He said security is a “priority for our nation, alongside development and well being of Rwandans,” adding, “the responsibility of the police goes beyond providing security” given the law enforcement body remains an essential and integral part of the country’s development.
Out of 458 cadets, 58 are women.
At the parade, the police officers pledged to uphold the law, stand up for equal rights for all, work with determination and never use their function for personal gain.
Kagame’s speech comes against the backdrop of allegations that Rwanda was involved in the killing of Patrick Karegeya in a South African hotel on New Year’s Eve and the recent attack on Nyamwasa’s home that saw three Rwandan diplomats expelled.
 
Rwanda denied the charge before expelling six South African diplomats.
 
Human Rights activists and politicians in western countries have since pointed the finger at Kigali for the attacks on dissidents in the Diaspora.
 
In a recent letter to US Secretary of State, John F Kerry, the chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, Edward R Royce expressed his deep concern over the numerous attempted attacks and killings of Rwandan dissidents living outside their country.
 
“Any functioning and responsible democracy allows the voices of opposition to be heard. Yet, in Rwanda there is a systematic effort to silence – by any means necessary – the voices of those who question the regime.”
 
Royce said allowing President Kagame’s rhetoric “and the slaying of dissidents abroad to go unchecked will only embolden the regime. Towards that end, I encourage you to closely re-evaluate U.S engagements with Rwanda and take into account these troubling actions when considering future assistance.”
 
Rwanda denies the allegations but does not show remorse.
Consequences of betrayal
 
A few days after Karegeya’s murder, Kagame told a high profile gathering at the Rwanda Leaders Fellowship Prayer Breakfast in Kigali, that “No one will betray Rwanda and get away with it.”
 
He added: “Regardless of who you are, there will be consequences. God gave us the strength to protect what we have built. Whoever it is, even those still alive will bear the consequences; it’s just a matter of time.”
 
Without mentioning names, Kagame said he “really don’t feel the necessity for politeness on this issue, no need for being diplomatic, of being politically correct. What’s surprising is that you didn’t do it, not the other way around. Because how can people betray their country… a country that made them who they are boasting to be today? All those fellows would have been nothing if it wasn’t for this country, if it wasn’t for Rwanda.”
 
 “Rwanda made them who they are today. And they have now turned against it; they are now insulting it, abusing it. I honestly have no diplomacy in that regard. We should have been the ones, we should have been the ones to do it; it shouldn’t have been somebody else. Because no one will do it for you, no Bangladeshi peacekeeper, no Pakistani, no white person, no one else can protect your country and grant you peace. Only you can do it, and you shouldn’t feel bad about doing what you need to.”
 
Speaking to Police cadets today, Kagame said his speeches have always been taken out of context and that he no longer cares about being misquoted. 

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